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U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst hugs a constituent at an event in Jefferson in 2015. Ernst said she is hitting the pause button on hugging in the current climate in which allegations of unwanted and inappropriate touching regularly arise with public figures. Ernst said she doesn’t want a warm, friendly embrace to be misinterpreted, meaning handshakes and simple “hellos” are safer for someone with a national profile and reputation to protect.
U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst hugs a constituent at an event in Jefferson in 2015. Ernst said she is hitting the pause button on hugging in the current climate in which allegations of unwanted and inappropriate touching regularly arise with public figures. Ernst said she doesn’t want a warm, friendly embrace to be misinterpreted, meaning handshakes and simple “hellos” are safer for someone with a national profile and reputation to protect.

U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst, an old-school rural populist with a folksy approach to retail politics, says she’s suspended the practice of giving hugs — gestures that have been primary features of her small-town way of greeting constituents and others in professional settings — for fear the embraces will be misinterpreted in the #MeToo era, the modern climate of evolving protocol on personal interaction.

  • Jefferson gets three hours of Fred

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  • Ed Smith, Hubbell talk health care, rural job growth

    Fred Hubbell and Ed Smith ran through a generous reach of topics, from health care to economic development in rural regions of the state to innovative ideas for attracting and retaining young people in Iowa, during an hour-long meeting in Carroll Thursday.

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  • Like surfers at the crack of dawn Democrats are thinking a lot about waves these days — political ones they believe are building toward the shores of 2018.

  • U.S. Sen. Joni Ernst, an old-school rural populist with a folksy approach to retail politics, says she’s suspended the practice of giving hugs — gestures that have been primary features of her small-town way of greeting constituents and others in professional settings — for fear the embraces will be misinterpreted in the #MeToo era, the modern climate of evolving protocol on personal interaction.

  • Iowa congressional candidate says ‘non-whites’ make excellent parents

    Dr. John Paschen, an Ames pediatrician running for Congress in western and central Iowa, singled out “non-whites” and “Mexican immigrants” for parenting praise in response to a general, open-ended question about trends in family dynamics he’s seen in three decades as a physician.

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    State Rep. Brian Best, R-Glidden, this morning said he’s running for a third, two-year term to represent Carroll and Audubon counties and part of Crawford County in the Iowa House.

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